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27 July 2005

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Yum, if only I could grow toms I'd be a happy man, unfortunatly my balcony gets no sun, the english climate is erratic and they'd probably get stolen by the nesting jays in the tree outside my apartment block. Sneaky buggers.

We have nets over our tomato plants, as the birds AND the deer (sneaky, cheeky buggers) snitch them.

Thanks for visiting! I hope to be in your country this year. I've heard they have farms in England...is this true?

: D

They look fantastic; I can hardly wait for my Romas to ripen. I like to dry my surplus tomatoes. Do you recommend a method of preserving roasted tomatoes (perhaps in good olive oil) or, failing that, any tips for how long you can keep a batch around, assuming they don't all get gobbled up in short order?

Leftover tomatoes? LEFTOVER TOMATOES?! I know you're speaking English, but the words have lost all meaning.

Um, the only thing we preserve these tomatoes for is another few minutes. Heh.

Maybe someone else can weigh in on the preserving them part. I wouldn't use a jar of oil, because that would get them soggy.

I hope you enjoy them. Thanks for stopping in.

I just came back to this post; my tomatoes are starting to come fast and furious and I thought slow-roasting would be just the thing to deal with some of the surplus. My comment has nothing to do with slow-roasting.

I didn't do a close reading the first time around, nor did I view the photos carefully. Just now, I clicked on that first photo to see it enlarged, and was surprised to notice those off-color plum-shaped tomatoes – which I happen to have growing in my garden. I went back to the text to see of the tomatoes were identified, because mine were mis-identified (so I thought) at the nursery where I bought the seedling. They were marked “Brown Cherry” and described as producing small, sweet mahogany-colored cherry tomatoes.

And now I read that yours were “not what was labelled”. I'd be curious to know how yours *were* labelled; maybe the original seed grower screwed up. Not that I'm complaining – they're delicious tomatoes, and I'll probably have enough to put up some sauce with (all from one plant, so they're delicious *and* prolific). I'm also growing Black Krims; the color and flavor are very similar.

I also just noticed the question about preserving these for long-keeping. I'll see if I can come up with something.

Hi Tana,

Love what this site has grown into. Just thinking about you and wanted to say hello. All is well up here is SF. I'm working pt as a chef for Nico Martin Presents and pt as an Assistant Banquet Event Manager for 5 Star Events. I miss you and think of you and the rest in SC from time to time. Have a beautiful day!! -Bailie

How delightful! :-) I was looking for a slow roasted tomato recipe this afternoon.... it has just rained here in Berkeley, everything is so fresh, and I had to go see how the summer's mad tomato garden was doing. To my surprise, there were tons and tons of tomatoes and new blossoms, too! I picked a big wooden bowlful and will roast them later this afternoon to have with dinner of baked squash, swiss chard frittata and an apple crisp. Thank you for the lovely description and inspiration!!!

I stumbled across your blog while I was doing some online research. I've done this myself, and the results are stupendous. Forget those bottled sun dried tomatoes. These taste like candy--only better!

I am definitely trying this Godiva recipe.

If I don't eat them all...how are the tomatoes best stored once cooked?

thanks,
A

I've come back to your blog after finding your Godiva tomato recipe last summer while searching for a roasted tomato recipe on Google. I passed this recipe on to my neighbor last summer. She doesn't really like to cook or garden, but when she was faced with a bumper crop of tomatoes from just a few plants, and once she tasted the rich, deep tomato taste from your godiva recipe, she was hooked! I packed mine (the ones I did not eat) in half-pint glass canning jars and stored most of them in the refrigerator, making sure to top each jar off with olive oil (this helps to seal out the air and preserve the tomatoes). I froze some of these half-pint jars too - you just need to be sure that you don't pack the jars too full - you need to allow for expansion - at least 1-2 inches. I prefer glass, because it is "safer" than plastic. The olive oil will congeal when it gets cold, but all you have to do is let them sit out at room temp and the olive oil returns to normal consistency. My neighbor froze her godivas in plastic ziplocs and she was happy too.

Today, my first 5 pounds of tomatoes (Black Plum, Principe Borghese and Riebenstraube) harvested this summer are roasting in my oven now and boy does my house smell great! I've already eaten a few right out of the oven and it never ceases to amaze me how the flavor intensifies once they are roasted. This year I took a chance on the Black Plum and the first time I took a bite while in the garden, I was not too impressed with the flavor, but then had to remind myself that this tomato was bred to be cooked into a paste or sauce. I just tasted a roasted black plum tomato from the oven and the flavor is divine! Thank you for the best recipe I think I've ever found on the internet!

I, too, have a bumper crop of tomatoes (went crazy and ended up with 85 tomato plants all heirloom and organically grown. I have planted 25 different varieties.

I like using a dehydrator to preserve these lovely toms. The Godiva recipe will work with the dehydrator too and can be frozen without fuss.

I also dry excess summer herbs (hardly happens) and use them throughout winter before the cycle starts over again.

Amen to the "bumper crop" people - we got a little excited with our first garden here in NC, and despite horribly hot weather and excessive heat, the over 200 tomato plants have done just fine, you can guess what the yield has been! Just made these with some of the Romas and LOVE them - thanks for the recipe!

I was directed to your site after doing a google search. I have an abundance of toms and I want to dry them. I understand your recipe but I would like to know the best way to preserve them?
Thanks!

Looks like I have one more blog to read. ;)

has anyone tried vacuum sealing them in a single layer and then freezing them?? usually this works for most ...well ...anything.

Can you safely can these tomatoes using the boiling method? I read somewhere that it is not safe and hope that is not the case.

Temperature - Fahrenheit or Celcius?

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